Loading…

平成も、もうすぐ終わり(英訳つき)

10年くらい日本を抜けて戻ってくると、和暦というか、元号がまだまだしっかり使われていることに、特に悪い意味ではなく純粋に、ちょっとだけ戸惑います。

いちいち換算するのが面倒だなあ、とか思いながら暮らしていたのですが、終わってしまうとなると、ちょっと寂しい。それにしても平成短かったなあ、と。

小学生に初級英語を教えていると、避けて通れないのが、How old are you?(あなた何歳?)の決まり文句。さあこのフレーズを使ってみよう!というレッスンの流れになったとき、子どもたちは大人の私たちにこの質問をするが大好きです。それに対して、私たちはI’m (数字)と答えます。

ただ、子どもたちにとっては、どうやら私たちの年齢は天文学的に大きな数なので、「え?それって何年生まれ?」などと、追加で質問をしたがります。

もう年齢自体を教えるのはあきらめているので良いのですが、この「何年生まれ」かという質問が、ちょっと困る。

そう、何を隠そう、子どもたちは、私たちが「平成何年生まれ」かを知りたがっているのです。

さて、これ、どうやって答えるか。これが難問。

とりあえず私は「西暦で言うと19XX年だよ」と言うのですが、そんな気取った大人の回答は、微塵も分かってもらえない。

え、それって、へいせいでいうと、なんねんなの?

仕方ないので、「平成っていう時代の前にさ、昭和っていう時代があって、その時代の○○年に生まれたんだよ」と言ってみますが、子どもたちの混乱顔の眉毛は、角度を上げるいっぽう。

そうです、昭和生まれのみなさん。昭和はもう、彼らの想像を絶するほど太古の昔なのです。

平成の次の年号で生まれてくる子どもたちには、どうやって昭和を説明するのがよいのでしょうね。そんなこんなで、平成が終わることによって、平和な習志野に住む、私の心配ごとが一つ増えました。こまったなー。

I’m probably not the only one who finds it difficult to get used to the Japanese year numbering system (Showa, Heisei, etc.) after being gone from Japan for almost a decade. I’m not really complaining, but it’s just not easy to remember both Western and Japanese years.

It’s been a pain to have to convert years sometimes, but regardless, it makes me a bit sentimental to think that an era (or a period) is coming to an end. It’s been a little too short, I think.

We teach young children English, and one of the set phrases we cannot not teach them is “how old are you?” Our kids love to ask us, adults, this question. We answer by saying “I’m (such-and-such age).”

There is a problem with that, however.

The numbers in our ages apparently are astronomical (too big) to these children.

So, they usually want to ask follow-up questions such as “what year were you born in?”

This question is harder to answer than it might appear at first; they are wanting to know what Heisei year we were born in. (That’s very cute, kids.)

To that, I take a seemingly sensible route and answer by putting the year in the Western year format.

“Well, I was born in 19XX.”

Their heads turn. This makes sense to most adults, but to children, it just flies right above their heads.

So then they ask: “but what is that in Heisei year?”

At this point, I know that there is no peg to put in the hole they’ve just made, but I continue:

“So, long long ago, before Heisei started, there was Showa…”

Their heads turn even more.

In case you haven’t thought of this… news flash, everyone: Showa is so ancient that kids these days cannot even begin to fathom what that is!

So, I have a homework for myself that I need to get done before Heisei ends: find the best way to explain what Showa is to the post-Heisei kids.

Wish me luck.

このエントリーをはてなブックマークに追加

コメントを残す